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Thread: TFO Deer Creek Spey 14' #6/7 line 4pc

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    orangevale
    Posts
    242

    Default TFO Deer Creek Spey 14' #6/7 line 4pc

    Just picked up one of these on kind of an impulse purchase and was wondering if anyone had experience with this rod. I haven't had a chance to take it out for a test run but bought it hoping it would work well with mid-belly lines. I currently have a Delta Long multi-tip and a CND GPS #7/8 laying around and figured one might make a good match.

    I noticed that this rod changed its grain window. The one I picked up was the newer version with the synthetic cork and 425-700gr window. I noticed the older ones were 400-650gr which is what I thought I was getting. Any difference in the rods or just labeled differently?
    What are other heads and lines people like on this rod?

    Thanks
    Russell

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    O'vale Ca., Estes Park Co.
    Posts
    141

    Default

    Thatís a long rod. Would be interesting to feel the difference to a 12í-12,6í rod. another thing would be how a short person like me would be able to have the rod in one hand and grab the leader with a fish on with the other without bringing all the connections in through the tip guide.
    I know you canít get away from it but,
    I like deltas.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sebastian, FL, USA, Earth
    Posts
    24,073

    Default

    14' two-handed/Spey rods are for wider rivers with longer Scandi floating heads or longer belly full floating lies.

    #6/7 line size would be for medium-sized/weight flies fished on or near the surface.

    It would be good in September on the wide Lower Klamath and Lower Rogue Rivers.



    People who fish the wide, shallow Snake River for Steelhead in Sept/Oct use 14' #7/8 line two-handed rods with longer belly floating lines.


    20 years ago or more the first Spey rods in the Pacific Northwest were 14' #9/10 line, 3 pc "beasts".

    Next, the popular size was 13' #7 line in 3 pc.

    Then the 12'6" #6 line in 4 pc was the go-to size.



    Small Trout Spey and small Switch rods are red hot and so much fun for larger trout and half-pounder Steelhead.



    Most use floating Scandi heads in the summer and fall with leaders the length of their rods.

    In the Winter/Spring many use the short floating Skagit heads with short sinking tips, short leaders and weighted flies with action.
    Bill Kiene (Boca Grande)

    567 Barber Street
    Sebastian, Florida 32958

    Fly Fishing Travel Consultant
    Certified FFF Casting Instructor

    Email: billkiene63@gmail.com
    Cell: 530/753-5267
    Web: www.billkiene.com

    Contact me for any reason........
    ______________________________________

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    orangevale
    Posts
    242

    Default

    Too funny.... Started out with a spey rod in the 90's on the snake/clearwater/ronde while at WSU. Saw a few guys fishing these long rods and had to give it a try. Picked up a 14' 9wt..... That was what everyone was fishing. Moved to a 15' 8wt when I finally learned to cast. learning out of the rio line insert and what few info I could find. No internet, had to buy or check out the books.
    Later moved to the 13'3" 3pc.
    Now fishing a 12' 7" 6/7

    I like fishing the long line and the longer rods allow you to airialize these lines and also lift up sunken heads at the end of long lines. I like fishing the longer rod on rivers as small as the American and the trinity. I just like throwing a longer line and not haveing to do allot of stripping. Always wanted to pick one up in a lighter line length but never wanted to put out the cash. This rod was cheap and can't wait to give it a try.
    I also feel that even though they are heavier, the long rods can fish with allot less effort if you get the stroke right.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kiene semi-retired View Post
    14' two-handed/Spey rods are for wider rivers with longer Scandi floating heads or longer belly full floating lies.

    #6/7 line size would be for medium-sized/weight flies fished on or near the surface.

    It would be good in September on the wide Lower Klamath and Lower Rogue Rivers.



    People who fish the wide, shallow Snake River for Steelhead in Sept/Oct use 14' #7/8 line two-handed rods with longer belly floating lines.


    20 years ago or more the first Spey rods in the Pacific Northwest were 14' #9/10 line, 3 pc "beasts".

    Next, the popular size was 13' #7 line in 3 pc.

    Then the 12'6" #6 line in 4 pc was the go-to size.



    Small Trout Spey and small Switch rods are red hot and so much fun for larger trout and half-pounder Steelhead.



    Most use floating Scandi heads in the summer and fall with leaders the length of their rods.

    In the Winter/Spring many use the short floating Skagit heads with short sinking tips, short leaders and weighted flies with action.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sebastian, FL, USA, Earth
    Posts
    24,073

    Default

    RSK,

    Amazing, you lived the entire history of two-handed/Spey casting/fishing on the West Coast.



    I am not a good Spey caster/fisher but I know the history well because my job was to have the right inventory for my fly shop.

    I also had the right staff who were Steelheaders so when Spey came along they all got deep into it.

    My staff were an pretty much very serious Spey fishers so I relied on them to help me have the right and cutting-edge inventory.



    One of the first to get the Spey bug was Jeff Putnam, over 30 years ago, at the beginning.

    He has recently moved up on the middle Rogue River to teach and guide Spey fishing for Steelhead



    We had top Spey casters, like Simon Gawesworth, come to the shop and give us and our customers lessons.



    Mike McCune grew up at our shop as well and has become a famous Alaskan and Pacific North West SH guide.

    He and his comrades have worked with Sage and Rio to develop the smaller rods and the short Skagit with their tip system.



    We also had Dough Duncan who worked for us, who is a long rod, long line, Spey caster who fishes the Snake every Fall.



    About 20 years ago we were the largest Spey/Two-handed dealer in California due to our staff.

    Oregon and Washington had and still has the best Spey/Two-handed fly shops.

    Today, Fly Fishing Specialties in Sacramento is the top Spey/Two-hand shop in California.



    Fly fishing for Stripers and Spey/Two-hand casting/fishing were the two best things that happened to our fly shop.

    In both venues, you are still actually fly casting without a "bobber.'
    Bill Kiene (Boca Grande)

    567 Barber Street
    Sebastian, Florida 32958

    Fly Fishing Travel Consultant
    Certified FFF Casting Instructor

    Email: billkiene63@gmail.com
    Cell: 530/753-5267
    Web: www.billkiene.com

    Contact me for any reason........
    ______________________________________

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Newcastle, CA
    Posts
    4

    Default Bill Kiene's spey casting skills

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kiene semi-retired View Post
    RSK,

    Amazing, you lived the entire history of two-handed/Spey casting/fishing on the West Coast.



    I am not a good Spey caster/fisher but I know the history well because my job was to have the right inventory for my fly shop.

    I also had the right staff who were Steelheaders so when Spey came along they all got deep into it.

    My staff were an pretty much very serious Spey fishers so I relied on them to help me have the right and cutting-edge inventory.



    One of the first to get the Spey bug was Jeff Putnam, over 30 years ago, at the beginning.

    He has recently moved up on the middle Rogue River to teach and guide Spey fishing for Steelhead



    We had top Spey casters, like Simon Gawesworth, come to the shop and give us and our customers lessons.



    Mike McCune grew up at our shop as well and has become a famous Alaskan and Pacific North West SH guide.

    He and his comrades have worked with Sage and Rio to develop the smaller rods and the short Skagit with their tip system.



    We also had Dough Duncan who worked for us, who is a long rod, long line, Spey caster who fishes the Snake every Fall.



    About 20 years ago we were the largest Spey/Two-handed dealer in California due to our staff.

    Oregon and Washington had and still has the best Spey/Two-handed fly shops.

    Today, Fly Fishing Specialties in Sacramento is the top Spey/Two-hand shop in California.



    Fly fishing for Stripers and Spey/Two-hand casting/fishing were the two best things that happened to our fly shop.

    In both venues, you are still actually fly casting without a "bobber.'
    I think Bill is selling his spey skills short - I remember when he was featured on the local PBS station, and he was punching lines across the river!
    Last edited by John Hogg; 06-19-2024 at 05:20 PM. Reason: spelling error

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