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Thread: Boat Recommendations for Lower A, Yuba and Lower Sac?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Granite Bay, CA
    Posts
    465

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    "fast moving water (like the LSAC)"

    Yes, I agree with this. It's a powerful river, and I should probably take it off the list for now.

    My wife may never agree. But a man can dream.
    TroutSource.com
    we deliver the river

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Stockton
    Posts
    238

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    I'm pulling for you Sir. And I hope you get one. I'm lucky with the wife unit. She prefers that I'm gone fishing. Everybody needs their Me time.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sebastian, FL, USA, Earth
    Posts
    23,310

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    All these interesting discussions gets me thinking about the old retirement thing.


    I am 77 and spent my entire adult life around outdoorsy men and fishing.

    My comment is, based on over 50 years of watching hundreds go through life, retire as young as fiscally possible.

    We are so programmed to work hard and long that retiring earlier than the average, 63?, scares many.

    I had two customers that told me they retire in their late 40s.

    We retired around 70 but we never felt like we were working at our fly shop.

    According to the top 10 life insurance companies, the longer you work, the shorter you will live.

    This is you and that is how the insurance companies make "trillions" of dollars using these factual statistics.


    Call, text or email me about your situation in regard to retiring.
    Bill Kiene (Boca Grande)

    567 Barber Street
    Sebastian, Florida 32958

    Fly Fishing Travel Consultant
    Certified FFF Casting Instructor

    Email: billkiene63@gmail.com
    Cell: 530/753-5267
    Web: www.billkiene.com

    Contact me for any reason........
    ______________________________________

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Granite Bay, CA
    Posts
    465

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    At what age does a drift boat become too taxing on the back? I'm not a spring chicken anymore. A small motor would be great for some applications (like running a stretch multiple times), but obviously most of the manuevering will be with the oars. My lower back is my achilles heal, so maybe I'm kidding myself to even be thinking of a drift boat at this age.

    Maybe this is how I can justify a lighter boat from BBB to lessen the strain(?).
    Last edited by Troutsource; 03-10-2023 at 08:02 AM.
    TroutSource.com
    we deliver the river

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    On the River in Shastanistan
    Posts
    155

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    Age is a relative thing and it all depends on your physical shape, and more importantly, how many people you know who can actually row! I'm 66 and I don't row the LSAC any longer. Anything fast gets a pass from me. I don't want to be entering a tricky section where I have to hit a couple of hard pulls on the oars and have my back blow out and miss them. But that's largely because I have a lot of younger fishing buddies who can row, who I used to row around before I got old, and now it's their turn.
    Seriously, if you're only going to use the boat a couple times a year, don't buy one. Go with a guide instead. But one positive aspect of a boat that should definitely be considered is: it's far more easy to fish effectively from a boat, and your catch rate will improve dramatically.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    East Bay
    Posts
    661

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    Iíve went from a float tube, to an aluminum 13í Gregor, to a brand new Clackacraft, to a 18í6Ē HewesCraft, and now to a Native Titan 12 kayak, and probably gonna go back to a small aluminum boat in a few years. The small aluminum boats and kayaks are extremely versatile. The drift boat was great and all BUT youíll need to know people who can row. If you wanna go by yourself youíll have to figure out a shuttle that you TRUST. I was going to buy a motorcycle but unfortunately thereís a lot of criminals in California. I donít trust a motorcycle to last long by itself. I rowed more than I fished. Itís useful if youíre on a river that has private property surrounding it (Russian). If itís for the lower yuba spend your money elsewhere. Buy a membership on the private property above the bridge. I downsized because I can get a kayak in a lot of good stillwater gems without having to pay monthly payments, gas for towing, launch fees, and tow my camper. Iíve caught the same amount and size fish on shore as in a boat.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Granite Bay, CA
    Posts
    465

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    OK, after reflection based on feedback I'm not getting a drift boat. I think I'm a little too old, and I want something more suited for 1-person floats and that doesn't require the hassle of a trailer or (much) maintenance.

    So I'm back to a 1-man pontoon.

    A friend bought one of these for east coast rivers like the upper Delaware and Salmon River and loves it (and they seem to get good reviews): http://www.catchercraft.com/1saltsteelheadpontoon Not cheap but I can get two for the price of one cheap used drift boat.

    This model has a solid casting platform, but you can only navigate with the oars (vs. flippers on my old one). It's a tradeoff. Anyone have any experience with both types? It seems like:
    - Flippers (like most models on the market): always navigable, including while fighting fish (flippers or oars), but casting from low to the water, and rowing is a bit tedious
    - No Flippers, but casting platform (model I'm considering): not navigable while fighting a fish (could be risky above rapids, but can drop anchor in some cases; rowing seems easier

    My original was only 7', with no casting platform, and this is 10' with a casting platform.

    Thanks in advance.
    TroutSource.com
    we deliver the river

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sebastian, FL, USA, Earth
    Posts
    23,310

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    Captain Andy Guibord likes a 16-17 foot Jon boat that is 60" wide at the bottom rear with a tiller jet outboard.


    He likes a set of drift boat oars and a bow-mounted electromotor.

    Andy says it does not work as well as a drift boat but it does not require a shuttle.
    Bill Kiene (Boca Grande)

    567 Barber Street
    Sebastian, Florida 32958

    Fly Fishing Travel Consultant
    Certified FFF Casting Instructor

    Email: billkiene63@gmail.com
    Cell: 530/753-5267
    Web: www.billkiene.com

    Contact me for any reason........
    ______________________________________

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    East Bay
    Posts
    661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kiene semi-retired View Post
    Captain Andy Guibord likes a 16-17 foot Jon boat that is 60" wide at the bottom rear with a tiller jet outboard.


    He likes a set of drift boat oars and a bow-mounted electromotor.

    Andy says it does not work as well as a drift boat but it does not require a shuttle.
    Thatíll be my last boat I buy (in a few years). A 14-16í jon boat. Pretty much a do it all. Unless thereís white caps.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    alameda
    Posts
    429

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    That is a nice pontoon! Reminds me of the Buck's Bags pontoon from years ago. My friend has one of the Buck's Bags pontoons that is similar to that one you posted on. It's a great platform but does have a few cons. First of all it is heavy, with the platform and all the options well over 100lbs as a comparison my Fish Cat 9 weighs less than 50 lbs. The other con is that it has high wind resistance, my friend counters that by using an electric motor (when he can) as an alternative my Fish Cat sits lower in the water and is not as affected by the wind. The saltsteelhead pontoon does keep you out of the water so you can fish it in all 4 seasons in CA, but when having to stop it you really need an anchor where as I can just put my feet down. That also means you can't use fins for slow speed maneuvering. The benefits of the pontoon you expressed interest in is that it handles rough water very well (if you stay seated), being able to stand does give you the ability to sight fish to rising trout calm waters which is awesome (I am always jealous). Overall I really like the saltsteelhead concept and having seen a similar pontoon in action I really like it. Just make sure you have a pickup truck to haul it because it is pretty heavy to move around.

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