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Thread: AR flows

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    orangevale ca.
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    Default AR flows

    American on the rise. 2000 cfs now. Supposed to go up to 5000 cfs by the 1st.

  2. #2
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    Aug 2020
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    Stockton
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    Cant wait to see it at that, Ive only ever seen the river at 1000 or below. Question is how long will it remain at 1000cfs and above? Im curious to see how much more water opens up to swinging.

  3. #3
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    We were on Christmas Island in Feb 1986 and came home to massive flooding in Nor Cal.

    Nimbus Dam was flowing over the top at 130,000 cfs.

    ____________________________________

    1986 California and Western Nevada floods.

    On February 11, 1986 a vigorous low pressure system drifted east out of the Pacific, creating a Pineapple Express[11] that lasted through February 24 unleashing unprecedented amounts of rain on northern California and western Nevada.[12] The nine-day storm over California constituted half of the average annual rainfall for the year.[1] Record flooding occurred in three streams that drain to the southern part of the San Francisco Bay area.[12] Extensive flooding occurred in the Napa and Russian rivers. Napa, north of San Francisco, recorded their worst flood to this time[13] while nearby Calistoga recorded 29 inches (740 mm) of rain in 10 days, creating a once-in-a-thousand-year rainfall event.[11] Records for 24-hour rain events were reported in the Central Valley and in the Sierra. One thousand-year rainfalls were recorded in the Sierras.[1] The heaviest 24-hour rainfall ever recorded in the Central Valley at 17.60 inches (447 mm) occurred on February 17 at Four Trees in the Feather River basin.[11] In Sacramento, nearly 10 inches (250 mm) of rain fell in an 11-day period.[1] System breaks in the Sacramento River basin included disastrous levee breaks in the Olivehurst and Linda area on the Feather River.[1] Linda, about 40 miles (64 km) north of Sacramento, was devastated after the levee broke on the Yuba River's south fork, forcing thousands of residents to evacuate.[14] In the San Joaquin River basin and the Delta, levee breaks along the Mokelumne River caused flooding in the community of Thornton and the inundation of four Delta islands.[1] Lake Tahoe rose 6 inches (150 mm) as a result of high inflow.[12]

    The California flood resulted in 13 deaths, 50,000 people evacuated and over $400 million in property damage.[1] 3000 residents of Linda joined in a class action lawsuit Paterno v. State of California, which eventually reached the California Supreme Court in 2004. The California high court affirmed the District Court of Appeal's decision that said California was liable for millions of dollars in damages.[14]

    .
    Bill Kiene (Boca Grande)

    567 Barber Street
    Sebastian, Florida 32958

    Fly Fishing Travel Consultant
    Certified FFF Casting Instructor

    Email: billkiene63@gmail.com
    Cell: 530/753-5267
    Web: www.billkiene.com

    Contact me for any reason........
    ______________________________________

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    The OV
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucas Dement View Post
    Cant wait to see it at that, Ive only ever seen the river at 1000 or below. Question is how long will it remain at 1000cfs and above? Im curious to see how much more water opens up to swinging.
    It opens up lots of new swing areas, eliminates others, and spreads out fish and fishermen. I like the river at 5k, it certainly reduces the choke points where anglers of all stripes tend to stand and snag. If you’ve never seen it above 1k, you’re in for a bit of a surprise. Many of the runs won’t look as different as you might think, but the actual holding spots will change. Overall, it’s good for the fish, good for the river, and good for those who fish ethically. See you on the water!

  5. #5
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    On the lower American river for wading I like 2,000cfs but a little higher is better for the fish (3,000).

    Drift boats probably like 5,000 so they can get by the waders.


    What do you think?
    Bill Kiene (Boca Grande)

    567 Barber Street
    Sebastian, Florida 32958

    Fly Fishing Travel Consultant
    Certified FFF Casting Instructor

    Email: billkiene63@gmail.com
    Cell: 530/753-5267
    Web: www.billkiene.com

    Contact me for any reason........
    ______________________________________

  6. #6
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    Aug 2020
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    Stockton
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    Going out tomorrow, trying to decide between the Yuba and American
    Last edited by Lucas Dement; 12-29-2021 at 07:08 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    orangevale ca.
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    You may want to reconsider The American and Yuba. The American goes up tomorrow to 5000 cfs. The Yuba is blown. Fished the American today and it was very little Visibility. With the increase in flows I would think it would be chocolate. I would give it a few days.

  8. #8
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    Aug 2020
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    Stockton
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    Didnt think about that. Ill save it for after the opener. Givea more time to tie up some flies, any suggestions?

  9. #9
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    Mar 2005
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    Sacramento
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    Maybe the feather? I havent looked at flows yet myself

  10. #10
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    Aug 2020
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    Stockton
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    I didnt feel like driving to the Feather today

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